Friday, 15 November 2002

November 15, 2002 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer

   Generally, I wish the people with whom I speak or see to “have a good day.”  Generally, they, in turn, respond by wishing me the same, though I have been known to receive the odd distempered grunt in response.

   The other day, just for the heck of it, I decided to wish everyone I with whom I saw or spoke to “have a great day.”   The effect of that one small change was incredible.  By changing one little word, I received all positive responses and, while some people expressed surprise at my ‘unorthodox’ greeting, I did not receive one grumpy grunt at all that day.  It is amazing how by merely changing one little word, a person’s whole attitude or perspective can change. 

   We must never underestimate the powerful effect the words we use have on others around us.  Words have the capacity to harm, to separate, to destroy, to demoralize, or to belittle.  Conversely, and to put a more positive spin on the situation, words also have the capacity to heal, to join, to uplift, to encourage, and to praise.

   More than the particular words we use, the tone we use to convey our point has an impact on others around us, as well.  A combative, or accusatory, tone is not going to win you many friends in the long run, especially if you use that tone in your greeting as you inquire as to their health.  On the other hand, a sincere friendly greeting accompanied by a genuine smile has been known to work wonders on even the sourest sourpuss. 

   As humans our automatic reaction, which is not always the best choice, is to respond to others in a similar manner to the way they approach us.  If someone shouts at you, the automatic response is to raise your voice back.  Instead, we should be approaching others with a smile and kindness.  After all, smiles and kindness are free and do not hurt anyone.  So...

   Have a GREAT day! :)

Beth

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Friday, 1 November 2002

November 1, 2002 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer

   Everything happens for a reason.  We don’t need to know what that reason is (though most of us would readily admit that we really would like to know!), or even how it fits into the general scheme of our lives.  Often, when looking back at past events, we discover patterns or explanations for why events happened as they did.  Sometimes, the purpose is still hidden from us.  While going through some of the old minutes at the Library, I discovered that there were three separate opportunities when I could have applied for the librarian position in Alix during the course of my career...and I never pursued them.  In fact, I purposely rejected those opportunities, and look at where I am now.  I never applied for this position, I was offered it.  I’m very glad that things turned out as they did, as I am very happy to be working in the Alix Library.

   The timing of events is perfect.  Though we rant and rave, grumble and fume, complain and groan, events happen to us in their own sweet time.  The other day I tried to look up information for our Library When in Oman evening on the Internet.  I sat down to complete my searches...no dial tone.  For over an hour I was unable to dial up to the Internet (one of the perils of rural communities)...then suddenly it connected as if there was never a problem.  The good news, I got over an hour’s worth of studying in that I probably wouldn’t have thought to do otherwise.

   What goes around comes around.  This is such a well-worn cliché that it doesn’t really need any explanation, but for some reason, too many people still don’t take it seriously.  Smile and the world smiles with you (another cliché).  Do a good turn for someone and the goodness you displayed is returned to you.  Extend your hand in friendship, and you will find friends everywhere you go.  We all are responsible for our actions.  Let’s make sure our actions are the type that we would want to boomerang back towards us.

Beth

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