Friday, 19 December 2003

December 19, 2003 Chautauqua

 
From the Editor's Computer     

  People tell me that time flies as you get older and each year passes quicker than the one before.  I can believe it, as this year definitely flew on by. 

   Here we are almost at the end of another year, Christmas is just around the corner, and it’s paper day again...and I haven’t had a chance to think of anything profound to share with you!

   This holiday season, don’t let the hustle and the bustle distract you from the real reason for all this excitement at this time of year.  Take a moment to remember friends and family, both near and far.  Share in the fellowship of others, be it at Christmas parties or special church services.  Remember there is more than one way to give to others.

   May your holiday be safe and full of fun and may the new year bring you endless joy!
 
Beth

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Friday, 5 December 2003

December 5, 2003 Chautauqua

 
From the Editor's Computer     

   On November 23, 2003, I was in Stettler to watch the Heartland Arts Troupe perform their rendition of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.  All the performers and volunteers are to be commended on an excellent performance.

   The cast and crew of the production willingly shared their various talents so that the members of the audience could enjoy the experience.  Not everyone can be the star of the production, but everyone’s contribution, no matter how small it may seem, is necessary for the whole production to occur.

   Each one of has a multitude of talents.  Some of these talents we share quite readily, others we keep hidden.  Some talents we wish to explore further, while others we refuse to acknowledge.

   Each of us has to determine which talents are most important to us, and which, depending on circumstances in our lives, we are willing to put on hold if need be.

   Only as individuals can we decide which talents we are going to develop and nurture within us, and then share with others around us.

   You don’t have to be perfect, or the star of the show, to share your talents.  What are you waiting for?
 
Beth

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Friday, 21 November 2003

November 21, 2003 Chautauqua

 
From the Editor's Computer     

  If you are like me, you have lots of dreams.  Dreams that you are still dreaming and hoping will come true.  You may have some dreams that you have changed as the years have passed and you have matured.

   On October 31st, I had a dream come true in my life.  My cousin and I had the opportunity to attend a concert of my all-time favourite singer, Don Williams, at the Jubilee in Calgary. 

   The magic in the room was incredible, as I joined the other members of the audience in singing the words to all our favourite tunes, such as Till the Rivers All Run Dry and I Believe in You, with the Gentle Giant himself, who performed in a very laidback manner.

   So, don't give up on your dreams, even the ones that seem impossible.  Dreams do come true...especially when you least expect it!  
 
Beth

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Friday, 7 November 2003

November 7, 2003 Chautauqua

 
From the Editor's Computer     

   After residing in the community for 24 years, I never thought I’d see the day when I was ashamed to admit I was a resident of Mirror.  Sadly, that day has arrived.

   On Oct. 27, 2003 the residents of Mirror voted to change our Village motto from “Pride is Our Locomotive” to “Stupidity is the Name of Our Game.” 

   To the 57 other individuals who voted to remain a Village, I would like to commend you on your stance, and thank you for your support for our community.  As for the other 80%, I would like to remind you of some events that have happened in the recent past.

   On February 18, 2003 I attended a Village Meeting in Mirror where it was mentioned that if the proposed budget was passed, we would face dramatic increases in our taxes and water rates.  Naturally, there was some concern about the proposed increases.

   Following the March 26 Village Meeting, a Council meeting was held, with Tom Roberts from Municipal Affairs, and the budget (with massive tax increases) was  passed.  I was shocked when most of the residents in the room erupted into clapping and cheering.  If you were one of those cheering...YOU asked for the high taxes we were faced with this year and YOU showed your support for the increases by your cheering.

   Jumping ahead to the night of Oct. 27th.  I heard that people were again cheering when the results were posted.  Just remember, when things don’t turn out like you think they will...YOU asked for this.

   Dissolution will not solve the problem facing Mirror - which is the majority of the residents living here.  It has been mentioned that Mirror is a caring community.  False!  Mirror has a handful of residents who care about the community and the people who live here.  The vast majority of residents are either too lazy to  do anything, or else they don’t care at all. It has been suggest that we just need to work together to make things happen. The residents of Mirror have not been unified or worked effectively together on anything for as long as I can remember.  So what makes you think that dissolution will change that?

   I was very disappointed (but not overly surprised) that the majority chose to listen to the various lies, misinformation, and misconceptions going around town, rather than listening to the truth. 

   Like lambs being led to the slaughter, the majority of residents living in Mirror have been cleverly manipulated into causing the community’s eventual downfall.

   I can’t believe that the majority of YOU fell for it.
 
Beth

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Friday, 17 October 2003

October 17, 2003 Chautauqua

 
From the Editor's Computer     

   I’m sure you’ve noticed that sometimes your life just hums along, everything going right as decisions and actions come almost effortlessly.  That is the time when we are so happy to be alive.

   Then there are the other times.  The times when you feel like you are fruitlessly banging your head against a brick wall.  Nothing goes right and every action is a major struggle.  Times like this you don’t want to even make a decision.

   If you take any difficult situation and get down to the basics, it usually means one of two things - either your on the right path, or you are not.

   If you faced with one difficulty after another, one disgruntled customer or client after another, one negative outlook after another, you might want to re-examine the direction you are traveling.  Perhaps you know that you are going the wrong way, but are too stubborn to admit it…

   On the other hand, you really could be on the right track and life still seems to be sending you through the wringer.  That is when you need to sit down and examine yourself - your beliefs, loves, fears and concerns.  This could be a time of growth for you. 

   Muscles grow strong through resistance and humans grow strong through adversity.   We think better and grow more when we are faced with challenges.  When this happens, we are forced out of our comfort zone into the unknown. 

    Life is an adventure...are you growing!
 
Beth

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Friday, 3 October 2003

October 3, 2003 Chautauqua

 
From the Editor's Computer     

   I have been fortunate to once again vacation by Alix Lake.  It has been a delight to see the multicoloured leaves reflected in the waters, watch the ducks gathering below my window and observe the sun set over the waters.  The early morning mist rising over the waters lends a mystical air to the scene.

   I took a walk around the Lake one afternoon.  It was a delight to walk along with the wind rustling the leaves overhead and my feet crunching the leaves below.  I was able to see where the beavers have been busy this year.

   Fall is an exciting time of year.  The days are getting nippier.  The leaves are changing colour and drifting to the ground.  The gardens and fields are being harvested.  Fall is also a time when many of us sign up for classes to learn new skills.

   As we approach Thanksgiving, we are reminded to count the blessings in our lives.  Despite everything that has happened this past year, we still all have lots to be thankful for.  Do you have eyes to see and a heart to appreciate the beauty around you...give thanks.  Are you healthy...give thanks.  Are you employed...give thanks.  Do you have friends and family that you are in contact with...give thanks.  Does your life have meaning and purpose...give thanks.  Did you wake up this morning...give thanks.  Happy Thanksgiving!
 
Beth

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Friday, 19 September 2003

September 19, 2003 Chautauqua

 
From the Editor's Computer     

   Each of us has countless opportunities throughout our days to make a positive difference in the lives of other people.  Random acts of kindness, taking the time to really listen to others, and helping someone in need, are all ways that we contribute to those who share our lives, be they friend or stranger. 

   I recently had the opportunity to help further the dream of a young man who’d almost given up on ever getting a break.  A chance comment by a stranger opened doors for this man that previously had be locked shut. 

   It’s a matter of being in the right place at the right time, but more importantly, it means caring for others.  How can you help someone today?
 
Beth

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Friday, 5 September 2003

September 5, 2003 Chautauqua

 
From the Editor's Computer     

 Everyone has their own reasons and motivations for choosing the jobs, work and careers that they do.

   Some people look for a job or career that pays extremely well.  Then, they spend the rest of their days struggling out of bed in the morning, forcing themselves to go to work at a job that they are growing to hate more and more, just because they get a hefty pay check every two weeks. 

   Of course, a subset of this group consists of those individuals who go to work expecting that same hefty pay check, but they don’t expect to actually do anything for it save sit around all day doing nothing.  Money truly does not buy happiness, health or peace of mind.

   Some people, on the other hand, choose a career based on the prestige and fame they will receive.  Little do they realize that fame is an illusion and the perks are fleeting.  They are constantly looking over their shoulder to see who’s threatening their position.  Their identity is jeopardized when the job ends.

   On the other side of the spectrum, are those individuals whose humanitarian efforts are largely unknown, but the results are appreciated by many as they work to better the lives of the underprivileged and downtrodden in our world.  They renounce money and fame in an effort to further their causes.

   The vast majority of us fall somewhere in the middle.  Whether you concentrate on the pay check or on the satisfaction of helping other people in your world, choose a job or career that you are enthusiastic about.  Your enthusiasm will be appreciated by those around you, and you will find that the work is more enjoyable in the long run.
 
Beth

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Friday, 15 August 2003

August 15, 2003 Chautauqua

 
From the Editor's Computer     

   My faith in humankind has been strengthened.  There are some really good people out there.  Of course, there are bad people too, but given the chance, some of them will occasionally come through when you need them to.

   The young man, whom I wrote about last month, made the right choice (even if he left it to the last minute) in the end.  I can only hope that he will start making better choices in his life, so he will not end up in a similar situation in the future.

   The Communities in Bloom group had a wonderful experience with some young men who helped them finish the work on Heritage Park prior to the judging.  Not only did these gentlemen help, but they also came up with some wonderful suggestions that were implemented into the design.

   We need to encourage our young people to get involved in the community more.  They need to know that their ideas are welcome.  They need to feel accepted and valued for the contributions that they can make.  They need opportunities to contribute in projects that are worthwhile and give them a sense of pride and accomplishment.  Communities in Bloom has made a step in that direction.  Who will be next?
 
Beth

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Friday, 1 August 2003

August 1, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   Friday, July 25th, I had the opportunity to attend a country dance in an old country schoolhouse that had been converted into a hall.  I can only imagine the number of dances that were held within those walls in the years since it was built.

   As the group of us in attendance laughed, joked, visited with neighbours and friends, snacked and, of course, danced the evening away, I was reminded of stories I’ve heard about the old-time community dances of yesteryear.  To help recreate the same atmosphere, we did have a local duo provide some old-time fiddle and guitar accompaniment.

   It was a wonderful evening, with everyone having lots of fun, from the youngest to the oldest.  A simple family event that will provide many happy memories. 

   In recent years, we seem to have lost the ability to just have fun.  One advantage of country living is that we have the ability to create fun out of the simple pleasures.  Fun that is not expensive and that you don’t have to travel hours for.  This tradition of the family country dance is just one legacy passed down from our grandparents that we should revive for future generations.

Beth

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Friday, 18 July 2003

July 18, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   Choices...we have all been faced with them, we have all made them, we have all made good and not so good ones, and we have all had good choices go bad because of someone else’s choice.

   Last week, I had the occasion to meet a young man who made a choice.  It was not a good choice.  It was not a well thought out choice.  It was an illegal choice.  It was a choice with major ramifications attached.  It was a choice that adversely affected others besides himself.

   Having made this choice, the young man is now faced with even more choices, and they are not going to be easy.  He is going to have to seriously think before he acts and make sure that he does not make a wrong move.  He certainly does not want to compound his bad choices at this stage in the game.

   Every choice we make affects not only ourselves, but others as well.  We have to be very careful when making choices in our lives.  More importantly, we need to look ahead to the possible ramifications of our choices, on ourselves and others.

   The choices you make can change the whole course of your life in a heartbeat.  Think before you act and pay attention to what you are doing.

   You have the choice.
Beth

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Friday, 4 July 2003

July 4, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   Despite what is happening in the world around us and at home, we truly are very fortunate to live in the country of Canada.

    One of my family’s Canada Day traditions is to watch the Parliament Hill noon-hour ceremony on CBC.  This year, the format of the ceremony was slightly different than previous years.  For instance, the Snowbirds began the show, not ending it as in the past.

    This year’s theme concentrated on the physical geography and beauty of Canada.  Governor-General Adrianne Clarkson pointed out in her speech that we have many great places of natural beauty to visit, not only in the summer, but all year round.  Canada is the place where we ‘can’ do whatever we desire as the possibilities are endless.

   Let us not take for granted the treasures we have around us.  Treasures of open spaces, clean air, nature trails, recreation areas, water bodies, and more.  People travel from around the globe to visit Canada and those places that are practically in our own backyards.

   This summer, take some time to explore the land around you.  Take a walk around Alix Lake, visit one of the many spots around Buffalo Lake, or take a trip to Content Bridge.  Be daring and take a drive down a country gravel road you’ve never traveled before, just to see where you end up.  The possibilities truly are endless. 

    Have a wonderful summer.

Beth

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Friday, 20 June 2003

June 20, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   As I type this, the time is currently 1:20 pm.  The paper should have been sent off to the printer over seven hours ago, and yet, here I am attempting to compose an editorial.  What’s more, I have absolutely no idea what I should write about.  In addition, I can think of at least a couple of things I’d rather be, or should be, doing.

   Very often in life, we wish we had all the answers, a crystal ball that revealed the future, or a large sign pointing us in the right direction.  Of course, we don’t know all the answers (or even all the questions for that matter), there is no crystal ball and there certainly is no giant direction sign showing us the next step in our lives.

   We have to keep on plugging away, doing our thing and hope for the best.  Hope that we are on the right path and doing what we should be doing.  Life isn’t easy, but nor is it overly complicated either.

   Keep smiling and looking up.  And don’t forget to enjoy both the sunshine and the rain showers, as both are vital for growth.

Beth

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Friday, 6 June 2003

June 6, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   Father’s Day is going to be different for my sister and I this year.  While we didn’t go all out for Dad, we did remember him on this special day of the year.  Though, with two incredible daughters like us, what more could the man have wanted?!

   “Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands...so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody.”  1 Thessalonians 4:11-12 (NIV)  These words could be used to describe my Dad’s life. 

   One of Dad’s greatest strengths as a father was his presence in our home.  He was always there.  If we ever saw something neat and nifty we could share it with Dad.  If I ever had a question, he was there to ask.  Though, one time I asked how big an acre was (in relation to an area that I could visualize) and his response was, “An acre.”  He had a very good sense of humour too.

   Dad believed in working hard and getting the job done. It didn’t matter who was responsible or what the job was.  If it needed done, you did it.  After many years working various types of jobs (he was a jack-of-all-trades), he retired and would often be seen around Mirror mowing and caring for neighbours’ lawns in summer and shovelling snow in winter.

   Dad was a man of immeasurable strength of character.  His tough inner core was pure steel.  He rarely complained about his health or little aches or pains - in fact, he often hid any problems he had.  Being sick was no excuse not to do what needed to be done - even if it was getting married (he apparently had the flu on his wedding day).  Dad was a very grounded, steady individual.  He usually didn’t get too worked up about most situations, and it took a lot to rattle that man.  Not that we tried to shake him up to often. 

   While he was a quiet man who didn’t like being in crowds, Dad was well known and well liked, as he would chat with anyone and everyone.  Often on a trip downtown, he’d chat with numerous neighbours and wouldn’t get home for a while.  In addition, Dad never hesitated to help someone if they needed a hand, or another pair of hands.  He was known for helping out various organizations in town - even though he was not a member.  Dad spent many hours helping with the Museum recycling program by sorting papers and cardboard galore.

   The woman I am now is due, in part, to the man that Dad was.  The example that he provided for my sister and I as we were growing up, and in the past years, has had a profound effect on our own personalities.  Our own inner strength and integrity are a reflection of his own, as well as our flexible, spontaneous natures.  

  Though he isn’t here to read this…

  Dad, this is for you.  Thank you for being such a wonderful father. 

   Happy Father’s Day!

Beth

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Friday, 16 May 2003

May 16, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   Graduation is just around the corner.  This rite of passage is an important milestone in every young adult’s life - the transition from student to adult, the movement from the safe environment of school to the real world.

   I have some thoughts I’d like to share with the graduating class…

   Be flexible.  This one attribute can make all the difference in your future dealings with people in your life, on the job and in the community.  Don’t bend over backwards to please people, but when situations change and plans go awry, be flexible enough to come back and keep going. 

   That said, always have at least one backup plan.  Life doesn’t always go exactly the way we want it to (surprise!) and it is good to have some options available - the more the better.

   Laugh...I heard a speaker say not that long ago that if you’re going to laugh about it five years from now, laugh NOW!  When it seems like life is throwing you curve balls and raining on your parade - laugh.  Humour can make any situation more tolerable and easier to handle.

   Have fun.  Life can be serious, worrisome and depressing, if you want it to be.  Or, it can be one exciting adventure after another.  It’s your choice.

   Congratulations to the Class of 2003!

Beth

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Friday, 2 May 2003

May 2, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   May 13th will mark the 5th anniversary of my librarianship at Alix Public Library.  Time really does fly by when you are having fun, or just having endless computer problems!

   The Library has grown and undergone many changes and improvements in the past five years.  How many of you remember what the basement looked like before the renovations?  My very first task as Librarian was to clean everything (including the spiders) out of the basement so the renovations could take place - that was definitely an adventure. 

   Other changes and improvements have included the acquisition of Internet computers, the establishment of the Audio/Visual Suite, “When in…” Supper evenings, increased hours, and a weekly Preschool Story Hour.

   Becoming the Librarian in Alix has been one of the best things to ever happen to me.  Looking through some old Library minutes, I decided that I was obviously meant to have this job because I refused to consider it through the years and I still ended up here!

   In 1994, friends told me that the position was available and I should apply.  All I could think about was that I never (never say never) wanted to work in Alix.  It was still too close to graduation, and at the time I didn’t have too many fond memories of the community.  I was very happy working in the Bashaw Library, and I felt that I never wanted to work in Alix.  Refusal number 1.

   Then in 1998, two days after the application deadline (whew, I was safe, or so I thought) it was mentioned to me that Alix Library had been advertising for a new librarian and I should have applied.  Even though the deadline was past, they might accept an application.  After all those years, my list of reasons for refusing to even consider the position hadn’t really changed.  Having missed the application deadline, I figured that would be the end of it.    Refusal number 2.

   The end of April, 1998, Kitty Parlby phoned me at Bashaw and asked me if I could train their new librarian.  I hesitated, but training was a different kettle of fish from working, so I agreed.  Little did I know that once they got me in the door, I wouldn’t get off so easy.  After mentioning to the lady whom I was training that my career dream had always been to be a librarian, she approached the Library Board and suggested they hire me as the head librarian, with her as my assistant.  When the idea was presented to me, I was very hesitant.   Unfortunately (or so it seemed at the time) my reasons for refusing seemed to be no longer valid!  I accepted their offer and the rest is history, and I have had no regrets.

   If you are unsure about what direction to go, don’t worry.  If you stay true to your personal values, you’ll end up where you should be!

Beth

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Friday, 18 April 2003

April 18, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   Have you ever noticed that just when you think you have it all together...life happens!

   Saturday I was in a rearranging mood, so decided to make some changes at the library.  I was having fun, and even discovered some treasures that I didn’t know existed.

   I decided to vacuum the floor, just to finish off the job.  Everything was going great, until I got to the stairs, where the vacuum died - painfully - with smoke and spewing of unmentionables.  The situation was made worse because we were having a supper that evening, and it was now impossible to breathe because of the smoke.  Needless to say, I had to come up with a rapid method of airing out the building and only a short time to do it in.  I did prevail, with the help of an air freshener, and our supper was a success. 

   What surprise is Life throwing your way?

Beth

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Friday, 4 April 2003

April 4, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   The moisture we have been seeing of late is a wonderful sight to behold.  Spring has truly sprung here in Alberta.

    Spring is a good time to reflect on our lives and our blessings.  As the earth comes to renewed life with buds appearing, as well as the green grass, we should take a moment or two and reflect on how we are coming more alive with the spring.

   Despite what is happening in the world all around us, we do have a lot to be thankful for, and I believe we need to remember that more often.  We all have umpteen things that we are grateful for, so start making a list.  See how long you can make it.

   Happy Spring! 

Beth

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Friday, 21 March 2003

March 21, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   How many times have you laughed today?  Have you even smiled today?

   It has been said that we do not stop laughing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop laughing.  Laughter is called ‘internal jogging.’  Anyone who has engaged in an uncontrollable belly laugh can attest to the ‘workout’ you get.  When was the last time you got a case of the ‘giggles’ and could not stop laughing, especially when those around you started glaring at your ‘misbehaviour?’

   We need to find the silly, ridiculous and the absurd around us.  If we open our eyes it is not hard to see how funny and amusing life really is, even in the hard times.

   One time I was driving to Bashaw on a very blustery day.  As I was driving, a Canada Goose attempted to fly over my car.  I say attempted because, as the goose got close to me, a strong gust of wind caused the goose to do a back flip before my eyes.  I swear that goose had the most surprised expression on its face.

   Take time to notice what is happening around you.  There is so much scope for laughter and amusement.  Not the malicious laughter aimed at another person, but the amused recognition of the ridiculous around us.  

   Read things closely...sometimes a seemingly insignificant spelling mistake can change the intended message entirely.  Or a slip of the tongue can create a moment of hilarity.

   Humour is all around us...in the people we meet, the things we read and watch, the events we engage in every day.  Take time to notice and appreciate the funny, comical and absurd in the world around you and happy laughing!
Beth

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Friday, 7 March 2003

March 7, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

  Life is full of surprises.  Just when you least expect it, they appear out of the blue.  Some surprises are good and others are not.

   A week ago, my neighbours had a baby girl.  Congratulations to them on the new addition to their family.  That was a good surprise...especially since the little girl came early!

   On Tuesday, many of us were very surprised to discover the grocery store was burnt down.  Not one of the most happy moments in town.  No only have the owners lost a business, but their home.  The community has lost a grocery store and a historical building (it was originally a theatre).  Thankfully no one was hurt.

   Good things happen and not so good things happen to all of us.  Most are generally small, almost insignificant, happenings.  Occasionally, we are shocked back into awareness by a major event, such as a fire.

   I read a very profound thought, and I’m sorry I don’t remember who said it, the other day…(paraphrased) It may not be your fault that you are down, but it is your responsibility to get back up

   We have been, and will continue to be, faced with events over which we have no control, events that may knock us flat.  While we can’t control the event, we can control our reactions to those events.  When we get knocked down, we have to get right back up.  Remember...a winner is someone who gets up one more time than he gets knocked down.

   Let us all work together, supporting each other and helping each other get back up!

Beth

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Friday, 21 February 2003

February 21, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   How have you challenged yourself today?  Have you challenged yourself today?

   Each and everyone of us should be doing at least one thing every day that challenges our brain and helps us grow and develop. 

   This challenge could be as simple as learning a new vocabulary word.  For instance, do you know what the word ineluctable means?  If you don’t, you are going to have to look it up yourself because I’m not giving you the answer!

   You could challenge yourself to read and research a topic of which you have no prior knowledge.  Everyday we read or hear about a topic that we’ve never even heard of before...take the time to find out more information.

   You could challenge yourself to take a class and learn a new skill.  The new skill you develop could become a treasured hobby or even become a stepping stone in your career development.

   You could challenge yourself to discover a better, or more efficient, method for completing your routine tasks, the tasks that you don’t like doing so you might as well find a way to make them fun.

   You could challenge yourself to replace one habit that is not beneficial to your life with one that is more beneficial.

   You could challenge yourself to be kind to that annoying person who grates on your nerves whom you have to work with every day.

   You could challenge yourself to find something good within everyone you deal with every day.

   You could challenge yourself to look at the world around you from a different perspective.

   Each day provides us with endless opportunities to challenge ourselves, to learn something new, and to grow as individuals.

   How have you challenged yourself today?

Beth

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Friday, 7 February 2003

February 7, 2003 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer 

  A pebble tossed into a body of water affects the whole body of water, with ripples reaching the furthest edges.  So too, a little grain of sand dropping into a body of water affects the whole body of water, with hidden ripples spreading ever wider until reaching the edge.

   Our thoughts, actions and words are grains of sand that we are dropping into the body of water of our world around us.  Our moods influence and impact everyone we meet and interact with throughout the day.

   What ripples are you sending out into your world?  Are you sending out a good mood or a bad mood?  Are you adding to the negative ripples undulating around our world, or are you sending out positive ripples?

   By the same token, what negative moods are you (un)consciously picking up and internalizing (harmful for you) or passing on (harmful for others)?  Do you collect negative moods from everyone you see around you?

   Just as throwing a pebble into the water will not erase the ripples caused by the piece of sand, its ripples will overpower the sand’s at some point.  We need to consciously make a choice to only collect and disperse positive ripples into our world.  By doing so, we can affect the whole emotional climate of our world.

   What ripples are you sending out?
 
Beth

Click here to read the complete issue of The Chautauqua.

To contact The Chautauqua, email: thechautauqua@gmail.com.

Friday, 17 January 2003

January 17, 2003 Chautauqua




From the Editor's Computer

  This is the first anniversary of The Chautauqua.  It is hard to believe that I have edited this paper for a whole year.  Time certainly does fly when you are having fun.

   This past year has been an year of change in our world.  At the global level, changes in climate, world relations and economics took place.  There are also countless predictions for the state of global conditions in the coming months, and they are not very positive.

   At the national level there were also changes - within the federal government, federal programs and climatic conditions that affected our national economy.

   Closer to home, there were changes in our communities and farming districts.  The closure of the Cheese plant in Bashaw was one event that greatly impacted our area. 

   With all the changes we have lived through in the past year, and all the changes in our world that we will probably be faced with in this new year, it is very important that we prepare ourselves for the coming events.

   We need to make sure that our mental outlook is flexible and open to the changes.  Some of us do not like change, but it is the only certainty in this life.  Resisting, or fighting, change only makes the situation more difficult to deal with, and makes us hard to live with.

   The generosity of Eastern farmers this past year with the Hay West program was a wonderful example of being open to change.  May we all be as generous to our neighbours in need, whoever and wherever they may be as our changing future emerges in the coming months.

   As I begin another year as editor of The Chautauqua I wish you all a year of personal growth, positive experiences and happiness in all that you do.  Thank you for your support in this past year and I look forward to continuing to amuse, educate and entertain you with the paper!

Beth

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Friday, 3 January 2003

January 3, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer

  The future lies before you,
Like a path of freshly fallen snow.
Be careful how you tread it,
For every mark will show.
(Author Unknown)

   Here we are at the beginning of a brand new year.  While some of us worry about what the coming days and months may bring, others of us are looking forward, in eager anticipation, to the adventures that await us.

   No matter how you greet this brand new year, not one of us really knows what the coming days and months will bring.  We can speculate, guess, and predict all we want, but it will not bring us any closer to knowing than we are now.

   There are already a host of predictions flying around - predictions of a coming war, further drought conditions, outbreaks of widespread disease, and the list goes on.

   Despite the uncertainty of the future we are about to embark into, there is one thing that we can be sure of.  The only thing that we have any control or influence over is our attitude.  The attitude in which we greet this new year is probably going to determine how we  will spend the year…

   So, if you want to make a New Year’s Resolution, resolve to look at your future in a positive light.  Look forward to coming events with anticipation, not dread.  Resolve to do your best to be a positive impact on your corner of the world.

   Happy New Year!  May 2003 be the best year of your life to date!

Beth

Click here to read the complete issue of The Chautauqua.

To contact The Chautauqua, email: thechautauqua@gmail.com.