Friday, 20 June 2003

June 20, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   As I type this, the time is currently 1:20 pm.  The paper should have been sent off to the printer over seven hours ago, and yet, here I am attempting to compose an editorial.  What’s more, I have absolutely no idea what I should write about.  In addition, I can think of at least a couple of things I’d rather be, or should be, doing.

   Very often in life, we wish we had all the answers, a crystal ball that revealed the future, or a large sign pointing us in the right direction.  Of course, we don’t know all the answers (or even all the questions for that matter), there is no crystal ball and there certainly is no giant direction sign showing us the next step in our lives.

   We have to keep on plugging away, doing our thing and hope for the best.  Hope that we are on the right path and doing what we should be doing.  Life isn’t easy, but nor is it overly complicated either.

   Keep smiling and looking up.  And don’t forget to enjoy both the sunshine and the rain showers, as both are vital for growth.

Beth

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Friday, 6 June 2003

June 6, 2003 Chautauqua



From the Editor's Computer 

   Father’s Day is going to be different for my sister and I this year.  While we didn’t go all out for Dad, we did remember him on this special day of the year.  Though, with two incredible daughters like us, what more could the man have wanted?!

   “Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands...so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody.”  1 Thessalonians 4:11-12 (NIV)  These words could be used to describe my Dad’s life. 

   One of Dad’s greatest strengths as a father was his presence in our home.  He was always there.  If we ever saw something neat and nifty we could share it with Dad.  If I ever had a question, he was there to ask.  Though, one time I asked how big an acre was (in relation to an area that I could visualize) and his response was, “An acre.”  He had a very good sense of humour too.

   Dad believed in working hard and getting the job done. It didn’t matter who was responsible or what the job was.  If it needed done, you did it.  After many years working various types of jobs (he was a jack-of-all-trades), he retired and would often be seen around Mirror mowing and caring for neighbours’ lawns in summer and shovelling snow in winter.

   Dad was a man of immeasurable strength of character.  His tough inner core was pure steel.  He rarely complained about his health or little aches or pains - in fact, he often hid any problems he had.  Being sick was no excuse not to do what needed to be done - even if it was getting married (he apparently had the flu on his wedding day).  Dad was a very grounded, steady individual.  He usually didn’t get too worked up about most situations, and it took a lot to rattle that man.  Not that we tried to shake him up to often. 

   While he was a quiet man who didn’t like being in crowds, Dad was well known and well liked, as he would chat with anyone and everyone.  Often on a trip downtown, he’d chat with numerous neighbours and wouldn’t get home for a while.  In addition, Dad never hesitated to help someone if they needed a hand, or another pair of hands.  He was known for helping out various organizations in town - even though he was not a member.  Dad spent many hours helping with the Museum recycling program by sorting papers and cardboard galore.

   The woman I am now is due, in part, to the man that Dad was.  The example that he provided for my sister and I as we were growing up, and in the past years, has had a profound effect on our own personalities.  Our own inner strength and integrity are a reflection of his own, as well as our flexible, spontaneous natures.  

  Though he isn’t here to read this…

  Dad, this is for you.  Thank you for being such a wonderful father. 

   Happy Father’s Day!

Beth

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