Friday, 16 December 2005

December 16, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Have you ever had the experience of scrambling to catch up in one (or more!) areas of your life?  You’re trying so hard to catch up that all you are focussing on is the goal and your sights are so far ahead of you that you have lost sight of the present.  You slave and scramble, cry and rail against life and try to keep from sinking under the weight of uncompleted tasks.

   Then suddenly one day as you look ahead to where you need to be, you notice that somehow, somewhere along the line you passed yourself.  How is that possible?  How could you not notice?

   Human beings can get so focussed on what we need to do that it is like we are wearing blinders which block out everything around us.  While it is good to be able to focus and get the job done, we need to balance that focus with time spent enjoying the fun things in life.  All work and no play or relaxation makes us not only dull, but sick, out of sorts and miserable souls to be around.

   So whether you are still scrambling up a huge mountain of to-do’s, whether you are almost at the top of the mountain, or whether you’ve reached the top and are basking in the glow of accomplishment, don’t forget to take time to enjoy the upcoming holiday festivity preparations.  Don’t get so focussed on what you think needs done, that you forget the people around you and the fun activities that you can attend.  Take a break from your routine  to restore your soul.  Enjoy the present moment without fretting over what you can’t change from the past or can’t predict for the future.  Relax with a warm mug of hot chocolate and have a wonderfully relaxing Christmas!   

Beth

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Friday, 2 December 2005

December 2, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Once upon a time, not so long ago, nor so far away there was a principality which was governed by a ruler who was both very wise and yet very foolish.  The ruler was exceedingly wise when following the advice of the wise advisors, and incredibly foolish when following the advice of the foolish advisors. 

   Unfortunately, the subjects of this principality never knew from day to day whether the ruler would act wisely, or foolishly.  Tensions ran high and tempers were short all around.  Even the various advisors didn’t always know which one  would be favoured that day to offer advice to the ruler...the wise or the foolish. 

   One day a stranger arrived at the ruler’s home and requested entrance.  Unbeknownst to anyone there, the stranger was the wisest and most knowledgeable advisor the previous rulers had ever had.  The stranger only appeared when the foolish were prevailing.

   The stranger was granted entrance and given food to eat.  Whilst he was partaking of his repast he observed the way the ruler interacted with the various advisors.  He noticed that the ruler tended to favour the foolish ones, ignoring the wise ones, yet acting like the opposite was true.  Thus, the reality was that the wise advisors were not asked for their advice and input.  The stranger found the situation to be most unique as he’d heard about the wisdom of the ruler in ages past. 

   Each day was a recurrence of the day before during the entire week.  The foolish advisors were favoured over the wise ones.  Thus the poor subjects were repeated victims of extreme foolish acts and proclamations.

   The stranger knew the situation was bleak for all, and that something needed to be done to transform the principality so it could thrive again.  He observed the situation for another week whilst he devised of a means to reveal to all what was really going on so that they could silence the foolish advisors, and allow the wise advisors to assist the ruler to restore order to the principality.

   Finally the scribe stood up one day and addressed the ruler, advisors, and subjects with these words…

   “Things are not as they should be,
With advice coming willy nilly,
The one who understands this clue
Can lead these people as the ruler true.

When I make my point
I leave no doubt,
Making my mark both
Within and without.

Lest thou fear
I’m easily mislead,
I keep my place
by using my head.

What am I?” 

Beth

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Friday, 18 November 2005

November 18, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   We plan.  We fret.  We ponder.  We struggle.  We dream.  We stew.  We obsess.  We hope.  We pray.  We wish.  We plot a course of action.  We get advice.  We research. 

   However, no matter what we do...life can change in an instant.  The familiar becomes the unfamiliar.  We are turned around and we’re no longer headed in the direction we were headed.  The pathway that we were journeying down becomes steeper/rougher/narrower and more challenging. 

   The change could be nothing more than a change in price that puts a material object out of our price range.  It could be a salary cut which affects how we live and pay our bills, or a loss of job which affects how we perceive our value in the market place.  It could be the onset of an illness - minor, chronic or terminal - which can alter our whole life path and how we relate to others.  Changing relationships can alter more than our life direction, they can alter how we perceive and express our own natures.

   The change could come in a much more catastrophic form.  Hurricanes, tornadoes, out-of-control rioting, fires, and major accidents all have a way of stopping us in our tracks and changing life directions.

   While it is obvious when something huge or bad causes a change in life direction, there are also good changes which can result. 

   Winning the lottery (this one is a mixed blessing!), getting a raise, starting a new job with greater opportunities to express who you really are, volunteer opportunities which allow you to share and give back to your community and neighbourhood, new relationships - can all dramatically cause your life and shift it in a new direction, but not in a bad way.

   Every experience is an opportunity for us to grow and become better people, as well as make the world around us better.

   Life can change irrevocably in an instant, a blink of an eye, or in a ‘minute and a half’ as described by a popular country song.  There will be no warning, no time to prepare.  We need to be ready now with a flexible outlook and strength of character which will allow us to handle the setbacks and wonderful events with ease when our lives change at a moment’s notice.  

Beth

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Friday, 4 November 2005

November 4, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   I have been a fan of bullriding for a number of years.  I actually come by my fascination with this extreme sport honestly as I come from a family with a long heritage in rodeoing and bullriding.

   Perhaps one of the more colourful of my rodeoing relatives was Dale “Hoot” Rose from the Redcliff/Medicine Hat area.  Dale reached the rodeo heights in the 70s, winning the bullriding at the Calgary Stampede in 1973 and then the Guy Weadick Award for sportsmanship in 1974. 

   One of my own earliest memories of Dale’s rodeo exploits was when he was gored by a bull at the Ponoka Old-timers Rodeo in the 1980s.  While the injury slowed Dale down, I do know it didn’t completely stop him from getting on the bulls in later years.

   Dale also trained a number of young rodeo hopefuls in the art of bullriding and calf roping beginning in the 1960s. Many of these young men went on to become rodeo champions and legends in their own right.

   Though a born cowboy, there was more to Dale than just rodeoing.  He was an accomplished woodworker.  As well, he was an incredible storyteller and wordsmith.  He was known for being able to spin a good tale.

   Dale passed away Oct. 27th taking his best stories with him, leaving us with memories.  

Beth

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Friday, 21 October 2005

October 21, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     
 
   Off and on for the past fifteen years I’ve flirted with the idea of becoming a computer guru.  Some days it seems like the perfect career choice.  Fortunately, I end up in a situation which rips the rose coloured specs off and reminds me why I don’t like computers enough to make a career out of them.

   Don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against computers, or using them to accomplish various tasks.  My bone of contention with them comes into play when I have to deal with hardware problems, and software/programming glitches - generally, any situation or problem requiring tech support to resolve.  Or when I have to complete a whole course on automation issues. 

   Thanks to this course I’m working on, I know, without a shadow of a doubt, that I am not meant to be a library computer tech or automation expert or systems analyst. 

   Sometimes we need to experience a little of what we don’t want in order to focus on discovering what we do want.  Sometimes it is easier to eliminate items, rather than add them, to our list of what we want to do in life.  When you find out you dislike a certain activity, be glad and then eliminate it from your life.

   In the meantime, I’ll make sure I always have at least one computer guru as a friend! 

Beth

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Friday, 7 October 2005

October 7, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Sometimes things just don't work out right in our lives.  It doesn’t matter what we do, what we say, or how we feel, things just go in a different direction than we want them to.

   I’ve been having one of those weeks where it seems like everything is falling apart, not moving, or not going how I’d like it to go.

   My studies aren’t progressing the way I’d like them too (doesn’t help that I started the course three weeks behind everyone else due to late textbooks) and I discovered I can’t submit my assignments as my professor is out of touch with a family medical emergency.   Tasks I want to complete at work and at home aren’t getting done for various reasons.  I’m in the midst of a couple strained friendships, and that barely scratches the surface!

   Sometimes when things seem to fall apart, we need to let go of our desire to control the outcome and just let them. Let the computer not work, let the other person be mad at you, let yourself be frustrated, tired and miserable.

   Everything happens for a reason and the timing is always right.  The frustrating delay right now could be just what you need to allow you time to accomplish something else. The problems in your friendships could give you an opportunity to reach out to someone else who needs a friend.  It could be that you need to slow down and take care of yourself. 

Beth

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Friday, 16 September 2005

September 16, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

  I was reading a book on Celtic Wisdom not that long ago.  One of the pieces of ‘ancient wisdom’ imparted was that we all live by a three-fold principle.  The three parts are:

  1. The necessity to suffer.
  2. The necessity to accept change.
  3. The importance of choice, or the exercise of free will.**

   The Celts believed that suffering is a gift.  We know that we are going to experience pain and suffering throughout our lives, so why not learn from it, embrace the experience to grow into a better, stronger person, and then let go of the pain and move on.

   It is said that the only constant in life is change.  The Celts realized that while change comes in our lives from forces outside of us, it is what is inside of us that determines how we respond to the challenges of change in our lives.  Again, embrace the growth and learning, but release the pain and misery.

   Often we make a decision, but we don’t follow through...or we hope by not making a certain decision our lives will not change.  It is the first two parts that make the third so important...many things will happen to you but nothing will remove from you your option to choose.  You are the one in control of your life and it is you who must chart your course.  

**Clan of the Goddess by C.C. Brondwin

Beth

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Friday, 2 September 2005

September 2, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer 

   For as long as I can remember, I’ve been a fan of chuckwagon racing.  Not the chariots, not the pony chucks, but the big chucks!

   For years the highlight of my summer was listening to the races from the Calgary Stampede on the radio.  It was so thrilling to listen to the action and wonder who would win.

   Life got even more exciting in the past three years as the World Professional Chuckwagon Association (WPCA) tour is broadcast for all the locations on the tour...10 races plus the Calgary Stampede.

   Each year I pick who I’ll cheer for based on their current standings, who has the best chance of winning, or just who I feel inclined to have as a favourite.

   This year I decided I’d better be cheering for a local guy...Reg Johnstone.  I wasn’t disappointed as Reg led the way with a number of wins going into the Calgary Stampede.

   While he had a few bumps and nudges with the barrels in a few of the races, Reg still came out a winner at Red Deer’s World finals in August.

   Congratulations to Reg Johnstone, the Bashaw Flash! World Professional Chuck Wagon Driver of the Year...first time he’s ever won this honour.

   And don't worry...I’ll be cheering for you all the way in the 2006 WPCA tour! 

Beth

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Friday, 19 August 2005

August 19, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Earlier this week we had various family members visiting us.  There was lots of storytelling, sharing and laughter.

   It is interesting how when family members get together, and the stories start emerging, the different perspectives you gain of people you thought you knew.

   Older family members relate stories of other relatives at a younger age, when involved in different activities, and had a different relationship.  You gain insight into aspects of personalities that you never had before.  Sometimes your burning questions as to why so-in-so acts in such a way are answered, and sometimes more questions are revealed.

   Sometimes shared memories trigger forgotten memories and open the door to deeper sharing.  Of course, there is also the chance that memories are revealed that someone thought were safely hidden. 

   We are all compilations of all the personalities within our families...the good, the bad, the sane and the insane.  We should be proud of our family histories and keep our own stories alive. 

   Pass the torch to the younger generation so that they can keep the family personality alive.  And if you are visiting relatives this summer...remember, no matter how bad they are, you can always go home!  

Beth

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Friday, 5 August 2005

August 5, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer 

  Sometimes when I’m asked where I get my ideas for my editorials, it is very tempting to give the glib reply, “Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits.”

   While doing some Internet research over the weekend, I accidentally came across a website that sells ideas to people “who want to write but don’t know what to write about.”  I also discovered that particular site is not unique in that there are a variety of sites which are selling ideas, for a variety of prices.

   Ideas are everywhere around us.  Want to write a letter or email to a friend?  Look at what’s going on around you.  Want to write the great Canadian novel?  What’s going on in your community that you could get ideas from (don’t mention specific people by name, they may not like it, especially if you cast them as the villain!).  Want to write an emotionally gripping poem?  What is going on in your life, what emotions are you dealing with, which you could express on paper?  What is going on around you that you can find humour in?

   Ideas are floating on the air all around you, you just need to open your eyes, ears, and heart to recognize them. 

   And...if you do write the great Canadian novel…I think 2% of your royalties would be a fair price for the ideas I’ve shared with you!  

Beth

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Friday, 15 July 2005

July 15, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer    
  
 Summer is here and the days are hotter!  Enjoy your vacation, if you are lucky enough to have one during the summer.  If you are not planning a vacation, take a day or two and road-trip around our area...there are lots of ‘hidden treasures’ just waiting to be discovered.  Spend time relaxing with friends and family.  Drink lots of water, wear sunscreen and don’t let the mosquitoes bite! 

Beth

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Friday, 1 July 2005

July 1, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Have you ever come across something that strikes you as absurdly funny?

   Last weekend I was shopping at Extra Foods in Ponoka.  There was a beautiful array of flowers and plants on the display outside in the parking lot.  The store employees had placed pylons around the plant displays to protect them from the vehicles.  Printed on the pylons were the words “Caution Wet Floor.” 

   As Mom and I were walking around these pylons to get to the store, and reading those words...the rain was just pounding down around us!

   Caution…Wet Floor! 

Beth

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Friday, 17 June 2005

June 17, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   The Alix Public Library just completed the planning process and has identified its five-year and long-term goals.  Every organization usually has some form of planning process that they engage in on a regular basis.  A process that identifies where the organization has been, where it is, and where it is going.

   Individuals too should be making short-term and long-term plans for their future.  It is good to have a direction, focus and goal so that you can stay on track as you travel through life. 

   While goals are good, often what happens is that individuals get hung up on the minute details and forget the overall picture of what they hope to accomplish.  When the details don’t appear, or react, in the preconceived manner and the right time, many feel that they are failing at meeting their goals. 

   As long as you have a destination in mind and are traveling towards it, you will get there even if life throws you a few curves, or you are required to make a detour or two.  Focus on the big picture of what you want your life to look like, and the little details will take care of themselves.

   And when life doesn’t seem to go the way you want it too, remember, your goals haven’t been derailed, you’re just on a scenic detour. 

Beth

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Friday, 3 June 2005

June 3, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   I was able to sleep on my own bed last Saturday night for the first time since November 21/04.  No longer do I have to camp out on the spare bed, or on the floor...despite years of floor sleeping at Guide camps and family outings, I think my body is getting too old to enjoy that novelty for any length of time.

   While we are bombarded with slogans and admonitions to watch out that we are not ‘getting stuck in a rut’ in our lives, there are some areas in our lives where consistency is a really good thing.  A comfortable mattress is one, but by no means the only area!   

   Changing just to change rarely works, and more often than not, backfires on the person or organization making the change.  Change that is the result of a spur-of-the moment enthusiastic burst of energy can bring about less than desirable results too.

   We should be continually striving to grow and stretch ourselves, get out of our ruts, challenge and change, but that growth work and change is best done from a solid, consistent base.  The basic structure of our lives - our values, beliefs, family, etc. - should be rooted and grounded, thereby enabling us to reach and grow knowing we have the security of a safety net to fall back on.  The deeper the roots, the taller the tree can grow. 

Beth

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Friday, 20 May 2005

May 20, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Each time I sit down to write an editorial I generally have a whole host of ideas and topics that I’ve been thinking about since the last editorial that I could share.  What usually seems to happen, more often than not, I am writing the editorial as the last item that needs completed before I send off the paper to the printer, so very little thought, time or effort goes into these endeavours.  (Except for this one which is being done early, but is short!!).

    We need to have a flexible personality and we need to be open to the opportunities around us.  Just because “we have always done it that way” doesn’t mean that we can’t explore a different path or direction.  If we want different results in our lives we have to do things differently.  If we want good things to happen...we have to be awake and willing to act when they happen!   

Beth

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Friday, 6 May 2005

May 6, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Number one is leadership. Everything else is number two. - Berthold Brecht

   An organization, business, committee, or any other grouping of people together for a specific purpose will be not be effective in meeting its goals or objectives if the leader is not effective. 

   The group will not move in a forward direction, if the leader is not looking in a forward direction to growth.  The group will not be able to weather the storms that inevitably arise (external and internal), if the leader is not strong enough to keep the group together.

   The importance of strong effective leadership is not stressed as much as it should be.  Often we take whoever wants to do the job (or who can’t say no!).  If we want our communities and their groups to survive, we need strong leaders.  

Beth

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Friday, 15 April 2005

April 15, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Spring is officially here.  The geese are back, the gophers are darting around drivers’ wheels, the pussy willows are out, and buds are starting to emerge on the trees.  Birds are chirping loudly every morning.

   Grass is getting greener and winter garments are being exchanged for lighter and thinner garb.  People are starting to think about working in their yards, and stores are stocking seeds.  More and more people are getting outside  to go for a stroll during these beautiful days.  

   Spring is a time of renewal and new growth.  Nature throws off the dreariness of winter and garbs herself in rich greens and bright flowers. 

   What I find to be most reviving about this spring, is the water in the ditches and low places.  It perks one up to see the dry places wet again.  The spring rains are also a welcome sight. 

   If you got in a rut over winter, allow this season of renewal and growth be a time of renewal and growth for you as you try something new. 

Beth

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Friday, 1 April 2005

April 1, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Everyone’s perception of a current situation is based upon their previous experience.

   I have completed the vast majority of my university studies via distance ed. (Athabasca) and on online.  Most of my undergrad courses involved a heavy workload, with not only lots of reading required, but lots of essays too.

   In comparison, the online graduate courses I have been working on, while still quite challenging mentally, really are considerably lighter in terms of workload - less reading as there is usually only one textbook, not five!  As well, instead of an 8 - 10 page essay (or even up to 12 - 14 pages), I’m required to write only 3 - 5 pages (and sometimes only 1 page!).

   In our online class discussion a few weeks ago, someone started comparing the workload of on-campus courses versus online courses, and some online courses from various universities (all in the US).

   While the other students were moaning and groaning about how much work we are required to do in our current online class as compared to the on campus students, I put in my two cents, letting them know that from my past experience, in comparison, what we were required to do was a breeze!  Needless to say, I’ve been severely outvoted in that regard.

   If you are used to only putting in the bare minimum of effort towards life, you will find it to be quite challenging and overwhelming when more is required of you. 

   On the other hand, if you are used to going the extra mile and giving more, you will not find it difficult to continue at that level, and you will appreciate it on those rare occasions when less effort is required.

   Are you feeling overwhelmed by the effort that life requires of you, or are you finding it a breeze?  

Beth

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Friday, 18 March 2005

March 18, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer      

  By now I’m sure everyone has heard about the four RCMP officers who were killed two weeks ago near Mayorthorpe.  To the vast majority of us, who did not know them personally, they are nothing more than a picture in the paper and a tragic headline.

   For me, that changed when I watched the memorial service last week which was held in Edmonton. Anecdotes, and other memories, shared by family and friends gave us all a glimpse into the personalities of these four men.

   A father spoke of his promise to his son, Peter Schiemann, to tell everyone of Jesus and the hope He offers to us all if anything ever happened to Peter.

   A fellow officer, and brother, spoke of how he idolized his older (by nine minutes) twin brother, Leo Johnston, and how he spent his life striving to be as good as Leo.

   A friend spoke about Tony Gordon’s fierce competitive spirit and how he usually won every competition, except when he played crib with his wife.

   A family friend spoke about how Brock Myrol had such an adventurous nature, and travelled to various countries, including Africa where he trained to be a guide.

   These are very small facets of each of the men, but facets that remind us that each was someone’s son...a beloved family member...a cherished friend...and so much more than just a tragic headline.  They had dreams...one was newly engaged, one a newly wed, another an expectant father.  They were loved and they loved in return. 

   We all should be expressing our gratitude to the members of the RCMP, whose presence allows us to live in the peace and safety that we all too often take for granted and expect will always be.  Our lives would be so different without them to protect us.  But we should be express our thanks all the time, not just when something tragic happens to remind us of what we have.

   We also need to remember that what happened to Peter, Leo, Tony and Brock could happen to any one of our own officers.  Let us pray that it does not.

   To the family and friends of the four men I extend my sincerest sympathies and prayers.  May their sacrifice never be forgotten.     

Beth

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Friday, 4 March 2005

March 4, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   I must be starting to get a touch of spring fever as I am sitting here and I can’t think of a thing to write!  Either that, or else I have so much swirling around in my brain that I can’t isolate one single thought that I am wanting to expand on or share.  I also hope I haven’t forgotten anything important.

   The days have been beautiful with the increased sunshine, warmer temperature, and melting ice and snow.  I’ve taken some time to work outside moving some of the more persistent piles of snow and ice. 

   Spring is a time when we throw off the darkness of the winter season and embrace the sunshine.  When we throw off the parka and look for lightweight clothing.  When we look for signs of new life and the returning birds.

   As we start moving towards more spring-like conditions outside, don’t forget to appreciate the changes around you as you add an extra “spring” to your step!  
Beth

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Friday, 18 February 2005

February 18, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer      

   First, I’d like to extend my sincere thanks to the kind folks who helped me get unstuck the past two paper delivery days.  Thanks to them, I was back on my way in a timely manner and was able to continue my deliveries.

   The latest topic of discussion in my management course is on mission statements and goals.  For those of you who think those two terms are interchangeable...they’re not.

   Mission Statements are short, easily remembered statements of where you are striving to go.  They do not reflect where you are now, but your aim for the future.  They are for an indefinite time period and can be modified.

   Goals, on the other hand, are definite, time related and are actions that are meant to propel you further along the road towards meeting the lofty aim of your mission statement.

   Too many people don’t want to adopt a quality mission statement because they can’t see past where they are right now.  Don’t be one of those in a rut.  Change!  Grow!  Move!   

Beth

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Friday, 4 February 2005

February 4, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

         I am currently taking a library management course as part of my degree program.  Not surprisingly this is a fairly new course and the idea of management in libraries in particular, while not a new phenomenon, is not something that was really discussed till recently.

   As this is an online course, the dynamics of class discussion are interesting to say the least, but not impossible through emails.  I’m not sure if it is the professor we have, or if it is the nature of the topic, but as a class we have been having quite the discussions about service or lack there of, the best/worst bosses we’ve had, and what the ‘ideal’ manager would do to bring about the desired results.

   What is interesting to me is how much we take good service and good work environments for granted.  Not everyone is so fortunate.  We expect, and often demand, that we receive good service when we are at a place of business.  But, this is a two-way street.  While the customer is always right, the customer should be respectful of the person serving them as well.  Then service will be good.  

Beth

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Friday, 21 January 2005

January 21, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

      I heard a really neat illustration not that long ago.  In reference to struggling church congregations, it was suggested that they need to learn to breathe water.

   This concept could be applied to any situation.  Instead of feeling like we’re drowning in work, obligations, worries, concerns, troubles, stress, responsibilities, committees, have-tos and so on, we need to learn to breathe water.

   This means that we need to look at life from a different perspective, approach our responsibilities in a different fashion, start looking at our have-tos and decide what we want to do, and stop dwelling on what we can’t change in our lives.

   When you think about this concept, most of us have experience with water breathing in one or more aspects of our lives already.  What we need to do is apply the concept to all areas of our lives.  

Beth

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Friday, 7 January 2005

January 7, 2005 Chautauqua


From the Editor's Computer     

   Sometimes something that should be a good thing turns out, through no direct fault of your own, to be a really bad thing.

   In November, a project was started in my life that should have been a good, positive thing...and it should have been completed by the end of that month.

   Unfortunately, the project continued into the next month and, besides inconveniencing a whole bunch of other people, totally turned my life upside down and inside out.  It still is not done and will become a massive undertaking to rectify the situation.

   Now, every once in a while we all need shook up and jolted out of our favourite ‘ruts.’  However, there is a difference between a rut-jolting and major upheaval that affects every aspect of your life in a very negative manner...health, jobs, social interactions, emotional and mental stability.

   When these ‘earthquakes’ rock our world, we have to make sure that we have something to ground us and keep us tied to the solid and sane.  It is important to have a support structure (friends, family) in place to lean on when needed until you get your feet back under you.

   We are at the beginning of a brand new year...and whether we are trying to survive a natural disaster, are grieving the loss of family or friends, are dealing with a major health crisis, or are having to deal with an unprofessional employee, we have the choice...either we can let the tragedies of life overwhelm us, or we use that time of upheaval to strengthen us. 

Beth

Click here to read the complete issue of The Chautauqua.

To contact The Chautauqua, email: thechautauqua@gmail.com.